THIS WEEK'S MAIN STORY

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MEMES OF THE WEEK


IN THE NEWS: THIS WEEK


Shelling out

Firms are providing taxable benefits-in-kind to their staff worth more than ever, the latest official figures from HM Revenue & Customs showed.  

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Sticking around

Over a quarter of people believe they will still be in full or part-time work when aged 70, according to a survey marking this week’s 70th birthday of the National Health Service.

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Growth industry

Over 100 frauds are now committed each year involving people paying for criminal record checks that are never performed or concern non-existent jobs, official figures revealed.

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Going missing

Staff at companies with over 250 workers are typically absent for 7.5 days a year, while those at firms with fewer than 10 people average just 2.8 days annually, according to research.

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Paying up

Food delivery brand Deliveroo agreed to pay each of 50 riders thousands of pounds in compensation before a dispute over whether they are self-employed went to a tribunal.

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Digital dividend

Organisations leading the way in integrating digital technology into their workplaces are more likely to have consistent feedback mechanisms for staff, a report said.

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Financial headache

Migraine sufferers each need to take up to 33 days off work a year to cope with their condition, a disorder which costs the UK economy £3.3bn annually, a study found.

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Telling porkies

More than a third of staff who’ve taken time off work due to chronic conditions have lied about the reasons for their leave, fearing colleagues’ reactions to the truth, according to research.

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IN THE NEWS: 29 JUNE - 6 JULY


Closed mind

A worker was unfairly dismissed for gross misconduct, after a Facebook post, because his employer didn’t approach the issue objectively, an employment tribunal has ruled.

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Staying behind

The median UK pay award was unchanged at 2.5 per cent in the last three months, meaning the figure has now trailed inflation for nearly two years, according to research.

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Change for the worse

Nearly 70 per cent of small business owners feel recent and upcoming tax amendments will have a negative impact on their companies, according to a new poll.

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Remaining requirements

The Home Office has revealed details of how EU nationals can apply for settled status, allowing them and their families to continue living and working here after Brexit.

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Missing the signs

Most UK employees struggle to identify symptoms of common mental health conditions, which could result in necessary treatment being delayed, a survey revealed.

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Shot in the arm

The Government has unveiled an £8m fund to boost the productivity and performance of small businesses in England.

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Cash concern

Misconceptions and ignorance about death-in-service benefits could be leaving many employees’ families vulnerable financially, research suggested.

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Rights answer

An employment tribunal has ruled 65 couriers with delivery firm Hermes are workers, not self-employed, and are therefore entitled to rights such as holiday pay.

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IN THE NEWS: 22 JUNE - 29 JUNE


On the slide

The UK economy is on-track to record its worst growth performance since the global financial crash of the noughties this year, a leading business representative organisation warned.

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Debarred dads

Nearly a quarter of men who became fathers in 2017 didn’t qualify for statutory paternity leave or pay, an analysis of labour force statistics revealed.

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Double trouble

More than half of workers with types one or two diabetes have also been treated for stress or mental health issues, according to a new survey.

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Disputed decision

A High Court judge has granted riders with delivery firm Deliveroo permission to challenge a previous ruling that they were self-employed and couldn’t be classed as workers.  

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Soldiering on

75 per cent of male employees put off going to the doctor when showing signs of illness for reasons including they don’t think they have the time, research showed.

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Here come the judges

The Judicial Appointments Commission is to recruit over 50 new judges in a bid to banish a backlog of employment tribunal cases.

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Not for me

Almost half of job applicants are deterred from pursuing roles after developing negative first impressions of the employers concerned, a survey found.

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Appointment admission

Over a third of bosses confess they are less likely to hire someone if they’re transgender, according to research for a law firm.    

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IN THE NEWS: 15 JUNE - 22 JUNE


Cash stash

A hoard of £30,000 in old 1940s banknotes – equivalent to more than £1m today – has been discovered under a shop in Brighton. The site, now a Cotswold Outdoor store, was previously owned by Bradley Gowns, and the sole surviving heir of the family that ran the chain reckons the money was stored in case his forebears needed to try and buy their way out of the country following a successful German invasion.   

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Ratio rules

New regulations requiring many companies to publish and justify annually the ratio between the pay of their chief executives and average UK worker have been laid before Parliament.

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Call for change

Employers need to adapt and provide more ageing-friendly support, so they are better-placed to engage and retain valuable older workers, a report said.

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Judgement day

The Supreme Court has ruled that a heating engineer was a worker and not self-employed, in a verdict that could have widespread implications for the gig economy.

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No favourites

The new Home Secretary supports a universal system of access to the UK after Brexit, rather than the one favouring EU citizens planned by his predecessor, according to media reports.

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Staying Down

Staying down: Official UK unemployment remained at just 4.2 per cent in the quarter to the end of April, its joint lowest level since 1975.  

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Surprise Slip

Expectations of an August interest rate rise reduced slightly after wage growth dropped unexpectedly from 2.9 per cent to 2.8 per cent in the three months to April.

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The Latest newts

Ed Sheeran has delayed the building of a private chapel on his Suffolk estate while a search takes place for newts. The move follows an objection to the singer’s plans from the county’s wildlife trust, which said there were reports of great crested newts – a protected species, as numbers have declined in recent years – in the area during 2015 and ponds on the estate could be breeding grounds. Ed has now commissioned a survey to identify whether newts are present, recommend any appropriate mitigation measures and advise on steps to enhance biodiversity.

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Carrying on

Half the people reaching State pension age in 2018 are considering working on, in the hope of boosting their incomes when they retire, research has found.

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IN THE NEWS: JUNE 8- JUNE 15


Injury time

Younger employees may be developing musculoskeletal disorders by spending too long using smart phones and other portable devices, according to an expert.  

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Dispute drop

The numbers of UK strikes – less than 80 – and workers taking part in them both hit record lows last year, new Office for National Statistics figures revealed.

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Wake-up call

Public Health England and Business in the Community have launched a toolkit for employers, so they can help staff with sleep and recovery, in a bid to secure business benefits.

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Supporting stability

A survey has found nearly two-thirds of employers think agency and zero-hours contract workers should be able to request stable contracts.

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Thinking again

Home secretary Sajid Javid has said the Home Office will review its immigration policies, potentially opening the door to more skilled workers coming to the UK.

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Lacking interest

More than three-in-five UK small and medium-sized businesses – three million companies – earn no returns on their savings, according to new research.

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On the up

Almost 60 percent of UK businesses expects their prospects to improve in the next year, with a quarter saying their position will enhance significantly, research revealed.

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Double take

Two-thirds of businesses fund marketing and customer relationship management (CRM) activity from the same budget, and only a third have integrated CRM systems, a report said.

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IN THE NEWS: JUNE 7 - JUNE 15


Injury time

Younger employees may be developing musculoskeletal disorders by spending too long using smart phones and other portable devices, according to an expert.  

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Dispute drop

The numbers of UK strikes – less than 80 – and workers taking part in them both hit record lows last year, new Office for National Statistics figures revealed.

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Wake-up call

Public Health England and Business in the Community have launched a toolkit for employers, so they can help staff with sleep and recovery, in a bid to secure business benefits.

Read full article here

Supporting stability

A survey has found nearly two-thirds of employers think agency and zero-hours contract workers should be able to request stable contracts.

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Thinking again

Home secretary Sajid Javid has said the Home Office will review its immigration policies, potentially opening the door to more skilled workers coming to the UK.

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Lacking interest

More than three-in-five UK small and medium-sized businesses – three million companies – earn no returns on their savings, according to new research.

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On the up

Almost 60 percent of UK businesses expects their prospects to improve in the next year, with a quarter saying their position will enhance significantly, research revealed.

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Double take

Two-thirds of businesses fund marketing and customer relationship management (CRM) activity from the same budget, and only a third have integrated CRM systems, a report said.

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IN THE NEWS: JUNE 1 - JUNE 7


Noses to the grindstone

In similar vein, around a quarter of small business owners took less than five days’ holiday last year with 15 per cent taking no leave at all, a survey said.

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Up against it

SMEs are facing potentially fatal challenges in trying to access finance to support the growth of their businesses, the commissioners of a survey have claimed.

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Work-life balance

Many working parents are labouring for long hours and feel this is affecting their family time, relationships and well-being, according to research.

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In the sick of it

The average employee worked for four days while genuinely ill last year, while over half put off seeking medical help because they didn’t want to take time off work, a survey said.

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Choice assistance

Business in the Community and Public Health England have published a toolkit to help employers support staff in making healthier choices about alcohol, drugs and tobacco use.

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Leave it alone

Forty per cent of UK employees took no more than half their holiday entitlement in the last year, according to research.

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Growing gulf

Disabled workers typically earned £1.50 an hour less than other employees in 2017, pushing the gap to its highest level in four years, a report revealed.  

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Stuck in the middle

The UK’s median basic pay award was 2.5 per cent for the fourth successive rolling quarter at the end of April, analysis has shown.

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IN THE NEWS: MAY 25 - JUNE 1


Fighting the flouters

The Government has launched a consultation on the best way to tackle the problem of some private sector businesses not complying with R35 rules on “off-payroll” working.

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Got a job on

Over 80 per cent of micro-businesses find it harder to attract applicants for posts than larger firms and over a third have difficulty finding the right candidates, a survey said.

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Cyber spaces

A year after WannaCry ransomware hit the NHS, gaps in their defenses mean 40 per cent of businesses feel more exposed to similar attacks than ever, research revealed.

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Not bothering

More than a third of workers say they never reclaim business expenses and nearly 60 per cent that they don’t do so if the amount involved is less than a fiver, a survey said.

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Helping hand

The government has announced a review into how it can assist businesses to embrace new technology and the latest management techniques, to boost wages and profits.

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Unprepared

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation takes effect today, yet less than a third of companies think they’re ready for it, according to research.

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Sack attack

An employer was liable for discrimination after dismissing a worker for behaviour relating to their disability, the Court of Appeal ruled.

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Apparel advice

The Government has issued guidance on how employers can ensure workplace dress codes are not discriminatory but has not toughened punishments for offenders.

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IN THE NEWS: MAY 18 - MAY 25


Payment problems

Many small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) owners are struggling financially and suffering from mental health issues because of late payments, research revealed.

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Time is money

Seventy-two per cent of SMEs are spending up to three days a month chasing funds they’re owed, a task costing them an average of £11,000 a year, a survey said.

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On yer bike

The Employment Appeal Tribunal has rejected a business’s claim that one of its cycle couriers was self-employed, rather than a worker, and thus not entitled to rights such as holiday pay.

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Under suspicion

More than one employee in 10 has suspected a colleague of taking illegal drugs, but 20 per cent of them did nothing to help or confront the co-worker, a survey indicated.

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Cracking down

The Pensions Regulator has said it plans to implement a “clearer, quicker and tougher” approach, including to ensuring employers fulfil their duties.

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Hire hopes

There’ll be strong growth in demand for labour in the second quarter of 2018, thanks to factors such as the Brexit transition period having been agreed, research predicted.

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Avoiding the issue

Nearly 60 per cent of workers wouldn’t be comfortable telling their boss they were suffering from a mental health problem, a survey said.   

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IN THE NEWS: MAY 11 - MAY 18


Staying put

The Bank of England decided to hold interest rates at 0.5 per cent after the Beast from the East limited economic growth in the first three months of the year.

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Slowing growing

The number of UK workers placed into permanent jobs rose at its weakest pace for four months during April, according to a survey of the recruitment industry.

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Present but not correct

Nearly 90 per cent of employers say staff have come into work when sick in the last 12 months, compared to just 26 per cent in 2010, research revealed.

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You’ve got it wrong

At least 1,000 highly skilled migrant workers are incorrectly facing deportation by the Home Office, MPs and immigration experts said.

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Off the rails

UK railway companies say they want to develop a new fares framework, partly because the current one doesn’t reflect modern working arrangements well enough.

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Time to get tough

The Director for Labour Market Enforcement has called for stiffer penalties for companies who exploit workers and flout employment law.

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Profitable probes

The return on investment for every pound spent by HMRC on large business investigations rose by 17 per cent in the year to the end of March, a report revealed.

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IN THE NEWS: MAY 3 - MAY 11


Mums on the make

The proportion of working-age mothers in paid jobs has risen by almost 50 per cent in four decades, according to research organisation the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

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Impact assessment

Nine in 10 recruiters and HR professionals believe Brexit is affecting their hiring strategies, revealed a survey by online business service LinkedIn UK.

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Staying in the closet

Over a third of lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and trans-sexual people have hidden their identities at work in the last year, according to research by pollsters YouGov.

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Rights direction

Several self-employed drivers are hoping a tribunal will rule they can enjoy basic employment rights, in a case against courier firm Hermes, which began this week.

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Over and out?

A quarter of people aged 55 and above with health conditions are thinking about stopping working, said independent charitable foundation the Centre for Ageing Better.

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Rising rewards

The most common UK salary increase in the first three months of this year was 2.5 per cent, the highest level for a decade, reported personnel management site XpertHR.  

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Freelance fund

Organisations hiring self-employed people should pay a tax that would help finance a pension auto-enrolment scheme for freelance workers, think tank Demos proposed.  

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Not guilty

It isn’t direct sex discrimination for employers to offer men on shared parental leave statutory pay while providing enhanced maternity pay to women, a tribunal ruled.

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IN THE NEWS: APRIL 26 - MAY 4


Struggling to survive

More than four in 10 Brits lack the cash they need to pay their bills in an average of seven months each year, according to a survey by research company OnePoll.com.

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Get on with it

Influential MPs have accused the government of being too slow to bring in measures protecting the rights of gig economy workers and people on zero-hours contracts.    

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Should I stay, or should I go?

Mental health matters cause over a third of UK employees to consider quitting their job every day, said a survey by accountancy profession benevolent association CABA.

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Taking it sneezy

One in five hay fever sufferers have time off work because of their allergy and a third admit lying to bosses about the reasons for their absence, research for Well Pharmacy revealed.  

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Brand awareness

Job seekers are 40 per cent more likely to apply to companies they recognise than employers they’ve never heard of, according to a survey by job and recruiting site Glassdoor.

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Win for whistle-blowers

The European Commission has proposed a new law protecting employees who expose corporate malpractice by public or private sector organisations anywhere in the EU.

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Not on offer

More than two-thirds of employers don’t provide any kind of financial support, such as debt counseling, to staff, said a report by employee benefits platform Thomson Online Benefits.  

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Holding out for a zero

The number of people on zero-hours contracts in the UK rose by about 100,000 to 1.8 million last year, around six per cent of all contracts, the Office for National Statistics revealed.

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IN THE NEWS: APRIL 19 - APRIL 26


Support act

UK employers are more likely to offer mental health support to their staff than companies in other parts of the globe, according to research by professional services firm Deloitte.  

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On the receiving end

A sixth of workers with diabetes say they’ve been discriminated against at work because of their condition, charity Diabetes UK revealed.

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Dads in dispute

Half of prospective fathers say they won’t take shared parental leave, as they earn more than their partners, according to a survey for comparison site money.co.uk

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Not up to scratch

Nearly 90 per cent of employees don’t feel their firm does enough to support them over work-related stress and other mental health issues, a survey by insurer Westfield Health found, but…

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Moving on up

The UK employment rate has reached its highest level since records began 47 years ago and workers have received a small wage rise, said the Office for National Statistics.

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Night owls

Employees who work into the night have a 10 per cent higher mortality rate than their “morning lark” colleagues, according to a study by two universities.   

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None of your business

Managers should be banned from asking job applicants how much they were paid in their last role, as this could help close the gender pay gap, some recruitment experts believe.

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I tweet you goodbye

Nationwide pub chain Wetherspoons has closed all its social media accounts, for reasons including concerns about the misuse of personal data and trolling of MPs.

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IN THE NEWS: APRIL 12 - APRIL 19


Working nine to five

Much of the growth in UK productivity – which remains a problem – during the last quarter of 2017 was due to workers putting in fewer hours, the Office for National Statistics said.

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Running out of time

More than £1.25bn in funding available through the apprenticeship levy remains unused and employers have just a year left to spend it, the Open University warned.

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Automatic for the people

A third of employees feel their jobs will be automated within the next decade and 10 per cent fear this will happen in the next two years, according to payroll firm ADP.

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Fit to drop

More than a quarter of adults exercise only once a week and a third say they wouldn’t be able to run a mile if their lives depended on it, a study by the British Lung Foundation found.

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Without a clue

More than half of employees with cancer don’t know their company has to make reasonable adjustments, such as allowing time off for medical appointments, so they can resume work, said Macmillan Cancer Support.

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Unfair treatment

A disabled worker has won £26,000 compensation after his employer warned him about the amount of sick leave he was taking and moved him to a customer-facing role, despite experts advising against this.

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Skill kill

Almost half of low-skilled or casual workers say their job doesn’t offer good opportunities for skills development, according to research by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development.

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IN THE NEWS: APRIL 5 - APRIL 12


Gap year

Seventy-eight per cent of larger employers pay men more than women, while only 14 per cent provide higher salaries to females, this year’s gender pay gap reporting revealed.

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Judge in-tune with musician

Acoustic shock has become an injury liable for damages, after a musician who suffered severe hearing loss while working at the Royal Opera House won his case.

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Burning issue

Four in five office workers feel burnt out, partly due to how their work is managed, and nearly three-quarters expect their stress levels to increase in the near future, a report said.

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Dosh divide

A cross-party group of women MPs has launched the #PayMeToo campaign, which plans to give females advice on how they can help their employers close gender pay gaps.

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Bereavement benefits

The Government has launched a consultation on regulations that would be needed if its bill proposing statutory pay and leave for parents whose children die becomes law.

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Strategy shortage

Nearly two-thirds of UK chief executives say workers’ mental health is a priority, and over 60 per cent of employers plan to introduce strategies for it by 2020, according to research.

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IN THE NEWS: MARCH 28 - APRIL 3


Highlighting harassment

Employers should have a legal duty to take effective steps to prevent sexual harassment in workplaces, the Equality and Human Rights Commission said.

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Interest rate falls

The number of EU workers searching for roles in the UK has dropped by more than 11 per cent since the Brexit referendum, according to jobs site Monster.co.uk.

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Publish or pay

Affected employers could face unlimited fines if they fail to reveal data on their gender pay gaps by the end of next week, the Equality and Human Rights Commission warned.

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Hurry up

The Association of Employment and Learning Providers is worried the Government is taking too long to publish guidance on off-the-job training requirements for apprenticeships.

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Cancer care

Almost 40 per cent of cancer cases among employees could be avoided if they adopted healthier lifestyles, said a study by charity Cancer Research UK and other bodies.

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In the dark

Many employees still don’t understand how pensions work, despite recent publicity and measures such as auto-enrolment taking effect, according to a leading expert.

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Future fears

UK employers are concerned they could be forced to move abroad if they have difficulty hiring workers from the European Economic Area after Brexit, government advisers revealed.

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IN THE NEWS: 22 MARCH - 27 MARCH


Do it for the dads

Policies to help fathers in the workplace need reform if the government is to meet the needs of modern families and tackle the gender pay gap, according to MPs.

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Hack issue

Health technology, such as pacemakers and wearable health monitors, often provided to employees as benefits, could be vulnerable to cyberattacks, the Royal Academy of Engineering warned.

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Wage gauge

Pay awards in 2018 are set to be the highest for four years, said a survey of private sector employers.

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No place like home

Over three-quarters of Brits don’t want a job that involves travelling and over a quarter say they’d refuse a post that involved this, research revealed.

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Thumbs down

Fewer than one in five SMEs believe the new Small Business Commissioner will help them over things like late payments and disputes with larger companies, a survey said.

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More money

Some disabled employees are to receive a 36 per cent increase in access to work grants, to help them in their jobs, from next month.

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Efficiency deficiency

Nearly 90 per cent of UK SMEs admit to having productivity issues, highlighting that they’re struggling to secure efficiencies, research revealed.

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Stalking point

A third of recruiters admit they stalk candidates online and two-thirds of applicants expect to be “Googled” by potential employers and those acting for them, a survey said.

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IN THE NEWS: 16 MARCH - 22 MARCH


Setting the standard

The first international standard for occupational health and safety management has just been published.

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Telephone tiredness

Sixty per cent of younger workers say they experience “smart phone fatigue”, through not being able to separate personal and work-related messages, a survey found.

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Hefty price tag?

Fashion retailer Next is facing an equal pay claim from 300 mainly female shop floor staff, which could cost it £30m.  

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Named and shamed

Restaurant chains Wagamama and TGI Fridays were among almost 180 employers revealed by the government as failing to pay the National Minimum Wage.

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Shooting up

Employment tribunal cases have rocketed by 90 per cent year-on-year since fees were abolished last summer, figures from the Ministry of Justice confirmed.

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Low on dough

Well over a third of retirees say they underestimated how much money they’d need to live comfortably after giving up work, a survey said. You have been warned.

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Confidence crisis

Nearly three-quarters of British workers feel their career has had a negative impact on their self-esteem, while over half say they place too much importance on their job, research revealed.

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Prize guys

Nominations are now open for the British Small Business Awards, the annual scheme for SMEs organised by smallbusiness.co.uk. If you fancy pot hunting, you’ve got until 26 May to chuck your hat in the ring.  

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Scone but not forgotten

Uproar in Cornwall this week after a restaurant published a promotional image of a scone on which the cream had been spread before the jam. Over 300 horrified locals complained that this made the item a Devon scone, not a Cornish one. The red-faced restaurant apologised for its “heinous error” and said the culprit had been told off and marched back to Devon. Quite right.  

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IN THE NEWS: 9 MARCH - 15 MARCH


Salary slip

An analysis showed discrimination over pay costs the UK economy £127bn a year in lost output.

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Part-time love

A quarter of employees would work part-time for less money, if it didn’t affect their career prospects, research revealed (no jokes about staff unofficially working part-time already, please).   

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Grating on them

Tempers flared at Brighton’s Big Cheese Festival after the event ran out of its main ingredient. Angry fromage fans demanded refunds, with one tweeting there was more cheese on her chips in town than at the festival.

“A few compromises had to be made and we are disappointed that a larger variety of cheese wasn’t available”, the organisers sighed.

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Apprentice approval

Nearly 40 per cent of employers believe apprentices will be their top source of emerging talent in 2018, said a survey.

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Stalling on the stats

With less than a month to go until the gender pay gap reporting deadline, less than a sixth of qualifying organisations had filed their figures earlier this week.

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Community concern

A report claimed employers are failing to develop the leadership needed to address society’s challenges like climate change and wealth disparities.

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Trust is a must

A quarter of UK workers have left an employer due to issues around trust and over half identify this as a prime reason to stay or leave, a study showed.

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Don’t call me that

Most employers think middle and senior managers would object to being labelled apprentices, meaning their businesses will miss out on leadership training funding, research revealed.  

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Labour pains

Two-thirds of SMEs are having problems hiring qualified staff and keeping employees, said a survey.

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Wage rise

It’s been reported that advertised salaries increased by 1.3 per cent, year-on-year, in February and by just 0.5 per cent, compared to the previous month.

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On the right road

Nearly 80 per cent of young people and a similar proportion of parents believe apprenticeships offer good career prospects, a study showed.

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Green gap

Britons are much less likely to recycle materials at work than they are at home, research revealed.

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Joy division

Male employees aged over 55 working in marketing, communications or advertising micro-businesses are the happiest in the UK, said a survey.  

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I hope that someone gets my…

We learned this week that the world’s oldest message in a bottle had been found on a beach in western Australia. Experts have confirmed the note is over 130 years old but denied rumours that it was written by Cliff Richard.

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IN THE NEWS: 1 MARCH - 8 MARCH


Going higher

Employers paying the apprenticeship levy can now use their funds to develop executive skills.   

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Grin and bear it

A poll indicated the average adult puts up with annoying or worrying health conditions for five months before seeking medical help.

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Definitely maybe

Nearly a fifth of employers can’t decide whether to increase staffing in the next four to 12 months, a survey revealed.

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Double trouble

The number of UK diabetics has grown by over 100 per cent in the last 20 years, said a study.

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Firing wad

A worker won £19,000 compensation for British Airways sacking him unfairly after he developed eye problems.

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A wee problem

This was the week a video of a Chinese boy causing a lift to break down by urinating in it was viewed over 12 million times. The footage was posted on the People’s Republic’s Twitter-style service by its government, with the Pythonesque headline “Stop being naughty!”  

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Some people…huh!

This was the week the Met appealed to frustrated diners to stop contacting it about the KFC closures. The bobbies tactfully explained that being temporarily unable to nip round the corner for a Boneless Banquet was “not a police matter”.

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The rights approach

Britons overwhelmingly back keeping, and often strengthening, EU-imposed rights for workers post-Brexit, research indicated.  

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IN THE NEWS: 22 FEB - 28 FEB


Ageing assets

A report said supporting older workers to stay in good quality jobs could unlock huge economic potential.

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Training at the leash

Two-thirds of workers have quit jobs due to lack of learning and development opportunities, research revealed.

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They’re looking at you

The government is examining whether employers have done enough to hack away barriers to ethnic minorities progressing careers.

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Against keeping Mum

Bun in the oven? A “depressing” survey revealed most employers believe women should have to disclose whether they’re pregnant during recruitment processes.   

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Court in the crossfire

The Supreme Court began hearing an appeal with potentially wide relevance centring on whether Pimlico Plumbers wrongly classed an engineer as “self-employed”.

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In the firing line

MPs criticised RBS over its treatment of small business borrowers.

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Under pressure

Salespeople are the most stressed occupational group in business, according to a survey of 3,000 workers by employee benefits platform Perkbox.

Almost 80 per cent of sales staff claimed they felt stressed by their work, compared to a survey average of just under 60 per cent.

Nice little earner

HMRC has revealed it collected almost £820m in extra tax through payroll investigations last year, as it continued to crack down on organisations wrongly classing workers as self-employed.

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